Deviant Login Shop  Join deviantART for FREE Take the Tour
×



Details

Submitted on
November 2, 2009
Image Size
989 KB
Resolution
432×324
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
1,117
Favourites
4 (who?)
Comments
5
Downloads
35

License

Creative Commons License
Some rights reserved. This work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
×
"I can recommend any reader who is not afraid of being late for breakfast to keep a bag of marbles in his bath-room." A. M. Worthington, A Study of Splashes, footnote on page 121

This animation is assembled from A. M. (Arthur Mason) Worthington's drawings of .15 inch diameter mercury droplets falling from 3 inches onto a glass plate. Some of these were drawn as early as 1876, using a nearby spark for very brief illumination. The thirty drawings (see source scans and references, from his 1894 book The Splash of a Drop) are at different phases of the splash, separated by about 1/600 sec., using machines that could repeatably produce a drop and vary the timing of the spark. He refined his equipment and techniques over several decades, eventually moving to photography.

Worthington, a physics professor, wrote and spoke eloquently about his methods, observations, and the physics behind drops and splashes, much of which is summarized in his 1908 book A Study of Spashes. Its opening line:

"The splash of a drop is a transaction which is accomplished in the twinkling of an eye, and it may seem to some that a man who proposes to discourse on the matter for an hour must have lost all sense of proportion."


----------------------
This image is dedicated to the Public Domain. There are no restrictions on use. Claiming to be the originator or owner, explicitly or implicitly, is bad karma. Credit to A.M. Worthington is appropriate.
Add a Comment:
 
:iconhotmetal53:
hotmetal53 Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2009
Wow! Has anyone repeated this with modern equipment?
--
Allen Brown [link]
Please check your assumptions at the door.
Reply
:iconmarkdow:
markdow Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2009
Not that I've found, but there are several good animations of water drops onto water surfaces at somewhat higher speeds. I'm tempted to try -- I think I can do a bit better than his drawings, but without a high speed movie camera I don't think I can do much better. I think the repeatable drop machine would be the hard part.
Reply
:iconhotmetal53:
hotmetal53 Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2009
Yes, I want to see one drop. It's not certain how much of what we are seeing is random differences and how much is the evolution of all drops. Plus there are too many variables for me to assume that water and mercury are equivalent.
--
Allen Brown [link]
Truth poses no threat to anyone save those who rely on untruth as the cornerstone of their foundations. --- Peter in Australia
Reply
:iconmarkdow:
markdow Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2009
Worthington made several comments about the variability and possible causes, and other features that he didn't draw. It would be nice to compare sequences from several independent drops.

And mercury is nice because it doesn't wet the glass like water or most other liquids.
Reply
:iconhotmetal53:
hotmetal53 Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2009
:nod:
--
Allen Brown [link]
Our country, right or wrong. When right, to be kept right; when wrong, to be put right. --- Carl Schurz (1829-1906)
Reply
Add a Comment: